Author: Lisa Dickmann

Tidying the Hard Stuff

Tidying the Hard Stuff

Sometimes it’s hard to finish tidying up because it means confronting painful memories. Letting go of the stuff may offer relief, healing, and even joy. Is it time to let go?  

Osouji – Japan’s Year-End Cleanup

Osouji – Japan’s Year-End Cleanup

Here in the United States, the New Year is seen as a welcome opportunity to make a fresh start. To help you get ahead on your resolution to get organized, The Container Store holds its annual sale on elfa® shelves. In fact, you’ll find plenty of organization tools (as well as yoga mats) on sale in January. But why wait? Put your affairs in order now so you can enjoy life in the new year. Wouldn’t you be able to get an even fresher fresh start by tidying and cleaning your home before the clock strikes midnight on New Year’s Eve?

In Japan, the end of December is the time of year to clean the home. It’s called Osouji, (pronounced OH-SOH-jee, and spelled in English in creative ways including oosouji and osoji). Osouji means “Big Cleaning,” and it is similar to…

Great Room Closet, Before And After

Great Room Closet, Before And After

Closet Before: A jumbled space (look at the far right and notice the storage unit that we moved into the closet)

Here is a “before” look at the storage unit.

A unique aspect of the KonMari Method involves moving furniture used for storage into your closet. With a few exceptions, storage furniture is not beautiful or necessary (in the way a chair is necessary for sitting or a bed for sleeping), but it simply serves the practical purpose of being a holding place for stuff. During this Tidy Upgrade of the Komono category, we discarded and sorted homeschooling and office supplies. Many paperclips were thanked for their service during this process. The metal shelving in the closet was discarded to make way for the storage unit, leaving space in the great room for a cute Montessori-inspired preschool area.

 

Rather than piling items on the floor of your closet (or purchasing expensive closet storage solutions), Marie Kondo recommends moving your storage units into your closet. That’s exactly what we did here. It was a perfect fit! I removed the door of the cabinet so the items would be easily accessible (and the cabinet door wouldn’t open in the closet). I also stacked the games vertically so that they would not be be piled on top of each other in an unsteady horizontal tower.

 

After: Neat and Tidy Closet.  The storage unit has been moved into the closet.

Each child has their very own drawer for storing their works-in-progress or special toys.  School supplies like markers, pencils, and glue are contained neatly in the top two drawers. Notice the vertical storage of games in the bottom right.  Here is the Montessori preschool space next to the closet. Spark joy!

I Kondoed My Hair, and I Couldn’t Believe What Happened!

I Kondoed My Hair, and I Couldn’t Believe What Happened!

Her name is a verb.  According to wiktionary.org, the transitive verb Kondo means “To tidy up using the methods advocated by Marie Kondo, especially keeping only those things that tokimeku (spark joy).”  You can “Kondo” your clothes, your books, your house, and even your boyfriend!

My bag is packed (vertically!)…

My bag is packed (vertically!)…

The suitcase is packed (all contents have been placed vertically and are easily visible) and my whole family is coming along to enjoy the great city of Chicago while I attend the KonMari Consultant training conference. I am very excited to gain expertise in the KonMari Method™ and […]